Surviving GE Products

Surviving B23-7s

During the 1970's, EMD was turning out a very successful and reliable Dash-2 line (GP38-2, GP40-2, SD40-2). General Electric, in an effort to gain lost ground, introduced an improved Dash-7 line which proved to be a huge improvement over the earlier U-Boats. Between 1977 and 1979, Conrail purchased 141 of the twelve-cylinder 2,250hp B23-7's.

In 1999, the fleet was divided between Norfolk Southern and CSX. Those assigned to NS were renumbered into the 4024-4091 series, while CSX allocated units became 3144-3189.

Surviving B30-7R's

The GE B23-7R was a manufactuer rebuild program that took older units and rebuilt them to Dash-7 standards. Conrail's B23-7Rs came from its acquisition of the Monongahela. All were modified by the Juniata Shops in the second half of 1993 to 3000hp units, making them B30-7R's. After the split, four became CSXT 3185-3188, the other seven became NS 4093-4099.

Surviving B36-7s

After a short tenure on NS and CSX, many CR B36-7's went to Brazil, where they were modified into 8-axle narrow-gauge units classified as BB36-7's.

Surviving B40-8s

GE's Dash 8 line was a much improved design over the previous Dash 7 line, which ended on Conrail with the C30-7A. Microprocessors in the Dash 8 line increased efficiency while boosting tractive effort. For the first time, GE units could monitor and diagnose themselves, which reduced downtime.

Built in May and June of 1988, Conrail purchased 30 of the B40-8's, numbered in the 5060-5089 series. Built with a 16 cylinder, turbocharged prime mover under the hood, these 4,000hp units were designed for light weight, high speed, and time sensitive intermodal service. 30 former CR/PC GP9's were traded in as part of the deal. (CR 7003, 7017, 7037, 7039, 7043, 7073, 7074, 7086, 7091, 7116, 7141, 7250, 7259, 7312, 7310, 7331, 7332, 7349, 7355, 7359, 7468, 7382, 7383, 7389, 7393, 7405, 7426, 7444, 7469, 7471.)

The original factory-installed, small single grab iron on the nose of the unit, also found on the C39-8 model, was intended for use when crossing between locomotives. They were replaced however, sometime in 1991 when Conrail opted for the upside down "L" grabs due to safety concerns and difficulty boarding the locomotives from the ground, account the higher walkway.

Conrail selected the B40-8 class to pull not only its hottest trains, but also to promote its Labor Management program in 1988. A large 'Working Together for Safety, Service, and Success' decal was applied to the short hood nose of each locomotive. The program encouraged workplace safety through Labor - Management cooperation and promoted the premier relationship Conrail enjoyed with its workforce. The program had seven primary committees, (one for each operating division) and another for all of Conrail's shops. These seven committees were comprised of 60 subcommittees, which were populated by union and management personnel.

In 1999, the fleet was divided between Norfolk Southern and CSX. Those assigned to NS were renumbered into the 4800-4817 series, while CSX allocated units became 5950-5961.

Surviving C30-7's

Conrail’s first purchase of six-axle locomotives was the 3,000hp C30-7 in 1977.  Assigned to CR series 6600-6609, they were joined by 65 units purchased from the Santa Fe assigned.  The former ATSF units were placed in lease service as CRL series 500-564.

Surviving C30-7A's

Conrail purchased all 50 of GE’s C30-7A’s, placing them in series CR 6550-6599.  The 3,000hp 12-cylinder units arrived on the system from May to June, 1984.

Surviving C32-8's

Conrail purchased all 10 of GE’s 3,200hp C32-8, placing them in series CR 6610-6619.  Conrail assigned the ten units to “Ballast Express” service in 1997.

Surviving C36-7s

In 1985, Conrail purchased 25 3,750hp C36-7's and assigned them to the 6620-6644 series. The C36-7's were built in June of 1985 on the same frame as the C30-7, and weren't a popular model among railroads. Two units (6620, 6621) were actually assigned Ballast Express service lettering, however, the rest of the fleet could often times be found hauling the stone and only a small handful ever received Conrail Quality paint.

In 1999, the fleet was divided between Norfolk Southern and CSX. Those assigned to NS were renumbered into the 8480-8493 series, while CSX allocated units became 7116-7126. In November 2000, Norfolk Southern returned the units to their lessor when the lease expired. CSX then picked them up and renumbered them to follow their existing ex Conrail C36-7's in the 7127-7140 series.

Surviving C39-8's

Conrail purchased a total of 22 C39-8's in 1986. The 3,900hp beasts were built between June and August of 1986 and were assigned to series 6000 - 6021. The C39-8, often referred to as "camelbacks" due to the large equipment blower and dynamic brake box located directly behind the cab, is almost identical to the earlier produced C32-8. The C39-8 was the last in the Dash 8 line to utilize two radiator exhaust fans.

The original factory-installed, small single grab iron on the nose of the unit, also found on the B40-8 model, was intended for use when crossing between locomotives. They were replaced however, sometime in 1991 when Conrail opted for the upside down "L" grabs due to safety concerns and difficulty boarding the locomotives from the ground, account the higher walkway.

In 1999, the fleet was divided between Norfolk Southern and CSX. Those assigned to NS were renumbered into the 8200-8212 series, while CSX allocated units became 7480-7498.

Surviving C40-8s

Conrail purchased 25 of GE’s C40-8 in 1989.  The 4,000hp GE’s were assigned CR series 6025-6049.

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